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  4. Neuropsin (OPN5)-mediated photoentrainment of local circadian oscillators in mammalian retina and cornea.

Neuropsin (OPN5)-mediated photoentrainment of local circadian oscillators in mammalian retina and cornea.

Buhr E, Yue W, Ren X, Jiang Z, Liao H, Mei X, Vemaraju S, Nguyen M, Reed R, Lang R, Yau K, Van Gelder R (2015) Neuropsin (OPN5)-mediated photoentrainment of local circadian oscillators in mammalian retina and cornea. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 112:13093-13098. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1516259112

Summary: Circadian clocks are found in most mammalian tissues. These clocks are synchronized by the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) in the brain. The local clock found in the retina does not require rods, cones, intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells, or the SCN. In order to determine what photopigments are responsible for local retinal photoentrainment, the authors used a candidate gene approach. For immunohistochemical studies on flat mount retinas they used a melanopsin antibody (Cat. #AB-N38) at a 1:1000 dilution. The data indicate that OPN5, also known as neuropsin, has a light-sensing function and is involved in retinal photoentrainment.

Related Products: Melanopsin Rabbit Polyclonal (Cat. #AB-N38)